EU strategy to destroy the Chequers ‘agreement’... | Page 51 | Vital Forums

EU strategy to destroy the Chequers ‘agreement’...

Our larger customers are stockpiling in anticipation of a no deal scenario with WTO terms. This will give them 2 years cover, at a price that will be significantly less and will give them time to source elsewhere/make inhouse. We will also be impacted by wto tariffs as most of our suppliers are based in the eu.
At last, someone comes up with a "reason" i.e. protection against possible higher costs.

But the assertion "will" be impacted by higher costs is an assumption.

Given Article 24 of GATT, the EU & UK could agree a temporary (up to 10 years) application of existing, zero tariffs.

Given the current imbalance in trade - and however bullshitty the EU might be on other stuff - please give reasons why the EU would automatically apply tariffs and on what things.
 

Wayne.Kerr

Vital 1st Team Regular
All due respect but those forty years must have an effect on your reading ability. It says that over half the raw materials are sourced in the UK and that the companies they supply are all multinationals.

Over half, even though there are 27 other countries in the EU.

I would be pretty certain that those multinationals have arms in the EU that need the UK raw materials as much as we need the EU raw materials.

And yet apparently the EU need not compromise as they will be unaffected by no deal.
I've to-day been prescribed a long term course of treatment based on drugs manufactured in Bulgaria. I hope the NHS is stockpiling them as I write.
 
At last, someone comes up with a "reason" i.e. protection against possible higher costs.

But the assertion "will" be impacted by higher costs is an assumption.

Given Article 24 of GATT, the EU & UK could agree a temporary (up to 10 years) application of existing, zero tariffs.

Given the current imbalance in trade - and however bullshitty the EU might be on other stuff - please give reasons why the EU would automatically apply tariffs and on what things.
As I said previously, if there is a no deal situation, I hope that there is a separate pharma agreement with no change in tarrifs. That should save my job...selfish, I know, but fuck it. It's everyman for himself now...we are also looking to halve our lead times!!
 

Wayne.Kerr

Vital 1st Team Regular
At last, someone comes up with a "reason" i.e. protection against possible higher costs.

But the assertion "will" be impacted by higher costs is an assumption.

Given Article 24 of GATT, the EU & UK could agree a temporary (up to 10 years) application of existing, zero tariffs.

Given the current imbalance in trade - and however bullshitty the EU might be on other stuff - please give reasons why the EU would automatically apply tariffs and on what things.
I think that one has already been answered in that with all the other trade agreements to be negotiated other countries might want some of the same. Sometimes tariffs are imposed to protect the local market; it's not as straightforward as you make out.
 
I don't think Tarian has any awareness of the real world. I'm not even sure he really has his own views as most of his posts are cut and paste jobs. To be prepared and point out potential problems associated with our exit from the EU is common sense not scaremongering.
"real world" - playing the man again WK ?
You really don't have much else do you.
Pots and kettles ? Look in the mirror ??

"pointing out potential problems" is fine - but asserting without explanation that problems are nailed on certainties isn't.

Most of the "proplems" with Brexit come from assuming that:
i) the UK economy is mainly about cross-border trade (It isn't)

ii) ditto > "with the EU" (It isn't)

iii) membership of the EU is overwhelmingly "good" (Where's the evidence?)

iv) absent membership, trade with the EU will be slashed ("Won't be" would be an assertion, so I'll just ask "why"?)

v) the UK is not strong enough to organise its own trade relations, (Far smaller nations manage an independent trade policy)

vi) the 15,000 non-trade EU laws have minimal impact on everyday lives (Many do, with costs)

vii) it is necessary to accept unlimited migration from a trading partner (It isn't. What other trade deals require "the Right to Settle"?)

vii) the EU has all the cards (it doesn't - or didn't until May caved in)

viii) that the worst scenario in 100 scenarios is the likely one (Surely the probability is more likely to be be nearer "business-as-usual?)

He can't even grasp why firms will stockpile; somehow he thinks there's some conspiracy why goods will not flow freely. Nothing of the sort, companies are just ensuring against hiccups that could occur around the time of the UK's exit.
WK.
No, unlike Mehmet, it is you who "can't even grasp why firms will might stockpile".
You still seem to think it "obvious" and "certain" that goods will not "flow freely" into the UK. (Your helpful link about chemicals explained nothing of the sort)
Read Mehmet's post - with the more plausible reason for stockpiling of protecting against possible higher costs.
 

Wayne.Kerr

Vital 1st Team Regular
Following receipt of the Chequers deal, the EU is proposing that the UK will agree to stick to EU rules on goods but fully quit the trading bloc for services - by far the country's biggest sector. Nice one Theresa.