EFL Statement: Board Update On Coronavirus | Page 3 | Vital Football

EFL Statement: Board Update On Coronavirus

#42
As a teacher, have no choice but to continue working. We spent the first part of this week setting things up for home learning for the children, but then since the government stipulated that vulnerable and key worker children will continue to be schooled/looked after/ childcared (delete as appropriate), we've spent the last two days trying to work out what the next few weeks will look like. Currently looking at over 100 children still being in school on Monday, plus the staff who aren't yet self isolating / showing symptoms.
Interesting and uncertain times ahead.
 

NottyImp

Vital Football Legend
#44
As a teacher, have no choice but to continue working. We spent the first part of this week setting things up for home learning for the children, but then since the government stipulated that vulnerable and key worker children will continue to be schooled/looked after/ childcared (delete as appropriate), we've spent the last two days trying to work out what the next few weeks will look like. Currently looking at over 100 children still being in school on Monday, plus the staff who aren't yet self isolating / showing symptoms.
Interesting and uncertain times ahead.
Good luck! I know other folks in the same situation.
 

devonexlondonimp

Vital 1st Team Regular
#49
As a teacher, have no choice but to continue working. We spent the first part of this week setting things up for home learning for the children, but then since the government stipulated that vulnerable and key worker children will continue to be schooled/looked after/ childcared (delete as appropriate), we've spent the last two days trying to work out what the next few weeks will look like. Currently looking at over 100 children still being in school on Monday, plus the staff who aren't yet self isolating / showing symptoms.
Interesting and uncertain times ahead.
bet you are glad you are not back in China now.

Keep safe and continue your training for the marathon...............you know it makes sense...........crack that 3hr barrier wearing imps colours.
see you in season 2021/2022.
 

Barney Imp

Vital Football Hero
#52
Mine have said that only with actual medical advice will they pay any SSP for this and then for only up to 14 days, for a single time.

We all challenged them on this and all we got was they had legal advice and no law has been passed compelling them to do anything. Blinkered in the extreme.
They have a duty to safeguard staff. Forcing a worker to attend work when that worker has declared they have the virus doesn't really fit with safeguarding other workers.

Perhaps you should declare that you have it, can't get a sick note - and then go and sit in the manager's office with a supply of dirty hankies....
 

57harry

Vital Squad Member
#53
I’ve been guilty of some bombastic comments since this virus situation first came to light - some of which I have come to regret, especially when you look at the desperate situation in Italy.

However, for those that remember my long rant on these boards a week or so ago, my primary worry was the analysis being done - in the mainstream media at least - on the statistics that are readily available, and their attendant effect on national and indeed international outlook and behaviour. Therefore, in the interests of balance and at least one alternative perspective, I thought some of these figures might be worth sharing (stats as of the morning of 21/3/20):

Current cases rated as serious/critical: 7,765 out of 172,641 - a rate of 4.5%

This serious/critical rate varies hugely among different countries:

Germany: TWO out of 19,600 (0.01%)
UK: 20 out of 3,741 (0.5%)
South Korea: 59 out of 6,085 (1%)
France: 1,297 out of 10,575 (12%)
Italy: 2,655 out of 37,860 (7%)

The mortality rate as things stand is 11,399 out of 275,952 cases (4%) although again there are major variations between individual countries, and of course major variations between different age groups and people with existing medical conditions.

All of these statistics are available at this website:

https://www.worldometers.info/coronavirus/

As for flu, the respected John Hopkins University states that there is an estimated 1 billion cases worldwide in a year, with deaths anywhere between 291,000 and 646,000 - a rate of 0.07%.

It's probably fair to say that these numbers could never be 100% reliable in a worldwide context, not least because flu has never been under the statistical mircoscope that Covid-19 is now. However, taking their highest estimates for flu cases in the US, the rate comes out at 0.1% - clearly well below the current mortality rate for Covid-19.

https://www.hopkinsmedicine.org/hea...ronavirus/coronavirus-disease-2019-vs-the-flu

What does all this mean? Goodness only knows... I'm not even sure the experts saying that the virus will have peaked in June/July or that 260,000 people will be infected in the UK have much certainty over the figures. What is clear is that there are massive variations and a lack of consistent statistical patterns around the world - maybe as a result of the lack of a consistent approach to the problem, not to mention the wildly different cultural responses. Japan for example is a very interesting case as they reported their first Covids back in mid-January - and yet still only have 963 cases out of 127,000,000 people (and have never seen rises above double digits throughout the crisis so far - just 20 new ones were reported yesterday).

https://www.bloomberg.com/news/arti...s-explosion-was-expected-in-japan-where-is-it

Finally, in my previous message, I related the story of my girlfriend who contracted Covid-19 during our holiday in Italy and made a swift and full recovery without infecting others around her. My personal situation now is that here in Malaysia (where I live and work), we have been placed in a virtual lockdown (officially called here a Restriction of Movement order) for 2 weeks. This effectively means that all except essential services/businesses are forced to close. This came about after a sudden spike of 190-150-110 cases over 3 days at the end of last week (we currently have just over 1,000 cases at 0.003% of the population).

Should this lockdown situation continue and be extended into the future, the effect on the company I work for will be catastrophic and will unquestionably end in salaries not being paid (I'd guess within another 2-3 months), enforced redundancies, repatriations etc. Even now, we have been instructed not to make new appointments or renew contracts, and this will affect direct colleagues of mine with families to support and bills to pay. I can survive this outcome, but the effect on our local staff - some earning less than £200 per month - will be horrendous. And for me, this is the real tragedy that is unfolding, and the thing that concerns me most when people talk of 3 month lockdowns for a disease that it is still only affecting fractions of the population (0.07% in Italy; 0.006% in the UK; 0.006% in China; 0.0008% in Japan). In my darkest moments, I can't help thinking that these days will seem like a tea party in comparison to the economic fall-outs we'll see if people and businesses are quarantined for months on end.

And so with that in mind, what actually is the endgame on this? Are we waiting for cases to reach zero before life gets back to normal? Are we waiting the months/years for a vaccine to be clinically tested and then be widely available for the 7.78 billion people living across the globe? Of course I don't have the answer for this, but I do wish there were some more indications from governments on what their long-term strategy actually is. That said, who'd want to be in their shoes right now?

I'm certain a Lincoln City message board isn't the ideal place for such a long and serious message like this, but I'm thankful this board is here to release such sentiments while I'm far away from home, as well as being populated with such a great mix of minds at times like this. Stay safe, healthy and well-informed guys, and let's hope we get to see some football again before too long.
Japan is an interesting stat-wonder why that is ? What is also interesting is that their bars,clubs,shows,cinemas ect remain open.
 
7

79imp

Guest
#54
Japan is an interesting stat-wonder why that is ? What is also interesting is that their bars,clubs,shows,cinemas ect remain open.
Very interesting indeed. They did quarantine the northern (and relatively sparsely populated) island Hokkaido for 3 weeks. That was where they'd seen the majority of cases. However, they're now preparing to lift that in readiness for the new school year starting the week after next. The overall message though from the very start of the outbreak in Wuhan seemed that there was no need to panic; get on with your lives as normal, but take every reasonable precaution and social distancing measure you see fit. So far, these measures seemed to have worked.

We can only speculate on other cultural reasons, but having visited there a couple of times, and with my girlfriend having studied and lived there for 6 years, I do know that they are an incredibly hygienic nation (far more so than anywhere else I have been); that they have a deep respect for rules and government (much more so than in countries such as Italy I'm sorry to say); and that Confucian values of collectivism over individualism are again far greater than we have in the west. You'd have to think that these areas have also played their part.
 

hulloutpost

Vital 1st Team Regular
#55
Basically Japan is a law abiding, respectful country as per 79imp. Likewise Singapore which must have one of the densest populations in the world. Although it should be at high risk I would not be surprised if Singapore escapes reasonably lightly.
 

collingham imps

Vital Squad Member
#56
Germany's is also interesting as at this morning over 25,000 with the illness and 33 deaths - wonder how that works when you compare it with the UK 5,000+ with the illness and over 200 deaths
 

Sincilbanks

Vital 1st Team Regular
#57
Japan is an interesting stat-wonder why that is ? What is also interesting is that their bars,clubs,shows,cinemas ect remain open.
Almost certainly testing, testing and more testing. Find the cases, find those who have been in contact, isolate them and continue testing. What all these countries have in common was a willingness to fight the virus every step of the way, from it's earliest stages, they therefore know exactly where it is, where the hotspots are and what measure need to be taken. In the UK we're flying blind to a large degree because our government packed in testing for the crucial 3 weeks it was needed the most.
 

Sincilbanks

Vital 1st Team Regular
#58
Germany's is also interesting as at this morning over 25,000 with the illness and 33 deaths - wonder how that works when you compare it with the UK 5,000+ with the illness and over 200 deaths
There could be (not saying there are) different criteria for categorising them as covid19 deaths, pretty sure there isn't an international standard on how to classify them.
 

Red Wimp

Vital Football Hero
#60
There could be (not saying there are) different criteria for categorising them as covid19 deaths, pretty sure there isn't an international standard on how to classify them.
Or UK cases are far higher than official figures because of testing, and therefore the real ratio in the UK is lower