workers shortage in the country

badge73

Vital 1st Team Regular
#1
watching the midland news and they were reporting on a shortage of workers in the countryside and the worry is a percentage of the food will not get picked and left to rot.

and indeed a link for it as well

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-england-18423671

so when we have those that say there aint enough jobs etc to go around what would there answer be to this problem? farmers are still having to try and import labour from abroad because the local labour force basically find it to back breaking.
 

Jonah

Vital Football Legend
#2
I know how they feel. We have a shortage of workers here too.

I was asked only the other day how many people work here and I replied "about half of them".




The old ones are the best.



 

OnMeHeadFred

Vital Reserves Team
#3
badge73 - 16/7/2013 15:01

watching the midland news and they were reporting on a shortage of workers in the countryside and the worry is a percentage of the food will not get picked and left to rot.

and indeed a link for it as well

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-england-18423671

so when we have those that say there aint enough jobs etc to go around what would there answer be to this problem? farmers are still having to try and import labour from abroad because the local labour force basically find it to back breaking.
The trouble with farmers is that they always demand to be treated as a special case.

These farmers should be investing in machines to do these jobs rather demanding cheap labour.

Farming should be treated just like any other industry: if they can't pay the market rate, they should go out of business.

What with the huge subsidies they get from CAP (the EU's biggest expenditure) they have been feather-bedded to the extent that they always think they are a special case.

They are just capitalists demanding cheap labour.

 
#4
The money is great for immigrants, but it's crap by our standards. Most won't go for it because of the paperwork with benefits given it is a short term contract.

If it was looked at sensibly far more probably would.
 

badge73

Vital 1st Team Regular
#5
not really as quite a few fruits have to hand picked and then selected depending on quality and shape of the fruit. they still have to pay minimum wage same as everybody else does ...

it just hides the fact that we have people moaning from the hill tops about lack of jobs, and when presented with a couple of months work just are not interested.
 

badge73

Vital 1st Team Regular
#6
mike, i chat to quite a few farmers as normally have stop at a few places in the countryside when out and about, they nearly all say the same .... when the british do actually turn up, they normally go after a few days complaining on how hard the work is.

years ago they used to have the students doing all the picking as they used to enjoy it, now they dont have the work ethic.

as per the short contracts, its not as bad as it used to be mike as long as they are kept informed its quite straight forward, plus consider those living with mom and dad who really have nothing to lose.
 
#7
It's not just minimum though, it's weights and targets, and as said you try organising benefits around a temp job for a month.

You're making it black and white and it's not. The article is a joke picking out 11,000 unemployed in the area, we don't run bus services to farms for a start, and that takes no account of age either.

If they wanted to run it sensibly, it should be through jobcentres who provide subsidized travel where both the employee and empoyer cover costs of transport - but it needs to be tied to existing benefits where people don't lose everything and then have to reapply which I believe is the case currently.
 

badge73

Vital 1st Team Regular
#9
well im looking at it from a different angle mike, as more pointing out those that still live with parents and no rent commitments etc, what would they be getting? something like 60 quid a week dole?

instead get hold of a cheap tent and sleeping bag, and jump on a bike (dole would most likely pay for that lol) and sort out a deal with employer etc.

plus if i was in good health i would be doing it like a shot, as some of the eastern european woman are quite tidy lol
 
#10
I'd imagine very few don't have rent/food committments if their parents are sensible but pint taken.

If farmers don't want to get involved in a co-op and share machinery, they really should do a transport deal with local jobcentre or agency, or basicly transform an old cowshed into a basic dorm to house them. Simple fridge, cooker etc.
 

badge73

Vital 1st Team Regular
#11
well after reading this mike ...

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/education-23315438

it looks like we could find an answer to those who dont like going out, couple of months in the country, gives them a lot of fresh air, bit of character building and pocket money. stops those about moaning about migration when we could have a national service of food growing.

did you know that if you want to stop in austrailia for more then a year then you have to do a couple of months in the countryside to earn your extension
 
#14
They bus loads of illegals from Smethwick every morning to the country side.
I mean there are not enough cars that need washing around here , so they have to do something inbetween signing on .

Many a true word spoken in jest
 

The Fear

A Wise Man (once sat next to him)
#15
They should change the benefit system to make it easy ( not easier, make it EASY) to put the benefits on hold when seasonal work is available.

Also, as above, these can be very low paid jobs with pretty poor conditions. Probably pays no more than the benefits some are on.
 

badge73

Vital 1st Team Regular
#16
work should always pay fear, and honestly agree with the farmers when they say our youngsters are not interested in getting their hands dirty, then again most of the farmers i chat to are well into their 60s to 80s (another sign of shortfall to come).

i might even email our local m.p about my radical idea for those n.e.e.t.s and those who want to live in this country, work the land for a couple of months etc that way every one wins, the country, migrants and youngsters who want to work and the farmer.
 

The Fear

A Wise Man (once sat next to him)
#17
But farmers don't pay/can't afford to pay too much for this manual labour, people won't get their hands dirty unless they are paid enough to do so.

Nothing to do with the usual folks blamed, the youngsters, plenty of older people who won't work
 

badge73

Vital 1st Team Regular
#18
well treat them the same as in austrailia, if they refuse or wont do the work then next time they go to sign on .... sorry no benefit till you get your card marked.

the farmers would have got the money but biggest problem is they cant get the revenue from their fields due to lack of workers.
 
#19
There your into a national service idea in effect as part of citizenship but you can't just force it without providing the means.

Force every 16-18 year old not in training who lives in the countryside to work for a month on a farm for minimum wage....and what do you do for the people who live in the City?

You can't discriminate like that.

Uni is seen as a right of passage by almost everybody, get out from under your folks and 'live'. 90% of the courses are bullshit, prepare very few for a job and haven't done for years it's just a good excuse to get laid and pissed unless you are extremely focused and take courses designed to further the career you want.

To really spark a youth movement on farming, it has to be rebranded so it becomes the idea of a right of passage, camping, earning whilst you do it, the facilities are there etc.

Most farmers also make shit loads from not growing anything these days thanks to useless EU subsidy and all that crap. Had they mostly run the business better and grown years ago (and yes I also understand the dumb restrictions our fucktards in Gov put on them that no other EU country does!) most farms would actually thrive.

Problem is most farms won't modernise and frankly love the subsidy and prefer cash in hand, and in today's society that no longer works.

This is why immigrant workers are brilliant, they really can earn more in this country in a week than they could in a month. They don't have the backup system so the culture is different.

Can't change our culture, without changing the culture and reprioritising beliefs as people grow up. A lot of kids don't do paper rounds, don't muck in gardening, schools sell off the playing fields so being out in the sun as opposed to on a computer is new for too many. Grow up hanging on a street corner, or in a bedroom on line and you won't naturally consider outside work.

When was the last time anybody on here went strawberry picking? Pick what you can eat, and also get a bit of cash - in hand - no invoice - no tax?

I haven't. I grow my own.

Society has changed too much and again, as previously mentioned Badge mate, you're generalising. We should be like Australia and force both 16 year old and 60 year old who are unemployed to do a few months hard manual labour because you don't make the distinction - what about people with health problems, asthma, allegies, hayfever even - expect them to hit the targets?

What it does show absolutely though is that whenever you look at something that we all feel is wrong, there is no single answer. It's entwinned with multiple other things that could be equally to blame and need to be addressed as well.

But let's not overplay things and talk about thousands upon thousands of manual picking jobs when it comes to farming. Most machines operate on a 6 tops basis when they aren't fully automated such as Leek picking.

Per farm of size we might be talking at best 50 workers, and yes that shouldn't be sniffed at, and those willing to take the job should have their benefits frozen other than any top up portion they are entited to, from the day they begin, and then restarted immediately the day it ends without the lag over period and all the crap about whether it means they are doing 'enough' hours for it to qualify as a proper part time job and not an excuse to remain on benefits.

That way everyone wins, the taxpayer is saved money for a period, business can maximise revenue, the individual gets some pride back etc.

As said before on here, or another thread...to be honest the best way forward would be to explode the whole system and start from scratch because it cannot cope with the changes to society, work patterns, and so on.

It would also be nice for poverty to mean poverty and not whether you have access to a PS3. Maybe money could then be focused properly, as well as education.

With the money the Treasury theives from everyone I think it's a disgrace we have food banks in the country. But hey, they refubish their offices, re-stuff snakes and some MP's continue to get turned down for expenses claims...what do they care?
 
#20
Rip it up and start again, a fair wage for the work, easy transition from benefits to work and (now this is the killer for those on benefits) easy transition back to benefits, if people believe they are going to have to go without just because they worked, they won't do it.

Work placements for those on benefits is fine, as long as it isn't a way to raise slave labour, and on that note we have how many prisoners exactly sitting on their arses in the warm playing a playstation? Prison workgangs could help to feed this country, even if you only used those in open prison, you would still have a significant workforce.