White lives matter - n/g | Page 14 | Vital Football

White lives matter - n/g

Buddha

Vital 1st Team Regular
At Tesco we can predict with a pretty high accuracy who are going to be the rubbish shoplifters. I'm sure a whole load more get away with it, probably more than we catch.

For the rubbish ones you can do it on their demeanour, body language and to some extent clothes. You can do it on their physical appearance; hair and skin (quality not colour or anything like that).

How people hold their bags is a huge give away too.

Our customers are split 50/50 between black and white but the shoplifters are about 90% white. It's probably about that ratio we keep a close eye on too.
So all I need to do to shoplift in Tescos is wear some quality clothing, have a confident and casual demeanour, hold my bag in a normal manner and black my face up...??!!

I've found that the best way too do it is just fill my trolley up and walk out, bold as brass!

Only joking, shoplifting is a silly thing to do. Easy to get caught and just not worth the bother unless you're absolutely desperate.
 

Jerryattrick

Vital 1st Team Regular
The whole "silence is violence" statement suggests that if you say nothing (either way) on the subject, you are part of the problem, or even worse, a racist.
This I object to. I won't take a knee, I won't protest or march on behalf of BLM. I agree with the movement and I agree with the sentiment but I will not apologise for the failings of others and I will not apologise for being born white, as a certain American police chief did last week.
I will live my life as I always have by treating all fairly and let my actions speak for themselves. That is surely a better way to "do our bit" against racism than any empty gesture displayed just because it is expected?
Also, people new to the antiracist movement do not realise that this is an easy out for most of them. Most people they meet with are having the same opinions as them or are inadvertently and unintentionally racist.

Certainly for many people they cannot always speak out in all situations as it is sometimes too dangerous to do so.

Its the old saying, actions speak louder than words.
 
When I was a student I had long hair and so I tended to get watched by security quite a bit when shopping. There was this one time when I hadn't found what I wanted so was just heading toward the tills with the intention to leave when the security guard stopped me and asked me if I had paid for everything. I was wearing a tight t-shirt and a pair of jeans I had put on that morning so were still tight so it would have been pretty obvious I hadn't slipped something in a pocket.

I commented that I wasn't even at the tills so wasn't even in a position to pay and that he should wait to see if a person actually goes through the tills without paying before challenging. I then loudly asked what he thought I had taken and if he thought I had stuffed a frozen turkey down my pants. He then noticed that some of the customers queuing were watching and muttered something while he backed away.

I never did go back to that store and knowing someone who was a manager in one of the stores in Gillingham I reported it to them. Apparently the store had issues with long haired student stealing stuff and so I got an third party apology for the security being slightly too agressive.

I bet a lot more people get watched for their appearance who are not black than what you think. I suspect people who were punks probably got their fair share of attention from security. I bet a number of bald people were confused with skin heads and were probably watched. And I bet most skinheads weren't actually going into store to shoplift or cause trouble. I wonder how many men who were into the likes of the Human League were probably watched due to the make up.
Us punks got it from all sides. The police, skins, soul boys and, strangely enough, indians (not seikhs or apaches though). The only support we got was from hells angels and afro-caribbeans (well, caribbeans ti be precise). However, the police never treated us as badly as they did the afro-caribbeans. They couldn't breath without getting searched. Strangely enough, the police tended to leave the Angels alone lol
 

Buddha

Vital 1st Team Regular
Absolutely. An underrated band. Strange that the bass player went from being "far left" to "far right" and back again. I saw them in a dingy Brighton pub a couple of years ago. Took me back 40 years or so. Marvelous stuff.
Can you remember the name of the pub? Or whereabouts in Brighton it is?
 

Buddha

Vital 1st Team Regular
Us punks got it from all sides. The police, skins, soul boys and, strangely enough, indians (not seikhs or apaches though). The only support we got was from hells angels and afro-caribbeans (well, caribbeans ti be precise). However, the police never treated us as badly as they did the afro-caribbeans. They couldn't breath without getting searched. Strangely enough, the police tended to leave the Angels alone lol
The punk movement was very important in the fight against racism. The influence on the punk scene of the West Indian culture/reggae music cannot be understated. It all led to the Rock Against Racism.*

Just listen to Don Letts, he'll tell ya!


*Who can spot the ex-Gillingham Grammar School boy and GFC fan in this clip from RAR?!:
 
The punk movement was very important in the fight against racism. The influence on the punk scene of the West Indian culture/reggae music cannot be understated. It all led to the Rock Against Racism.*

Just listen to Don Letts, he'll tell ya!


*Who can spot the ex-Gillingham Grammar School boy and GFC fan in this clip from RAR?!:
I think the punk scene, especially the anarcho scene, has had a major influence on todays society. There was so much activism; RAR and ANL, ALF, Vegetarianism/veganism, environmental groups, etc were all part and parcel of the scene. Some of us got plenty of bumps and bruises 🥊🥊🥊🥊
 

Buddha

Vital 1st Team Regular
I think the punk scene, especially the anarcho scene, has had a major influence on todays society. There was so much activism; RAR and ANL, ALF, Vegetarianism/veganism, environmental groups, etc were all part and parcel of the scene. Some of us got plenty of bumps and bruises 🥊🥊🥊🥊
Absolutely mate! Veganism has almost become fashionable. I'm too young to be a proper punk but even in my youth veganism was pretty radical. Now you can get a fucking vegan sausage roll in Greggs!

And as you say, the whole DIY ethic and awareness of issues such as environmentalism, anti-racism, anti-war; basically all the stuff Crass used to bang on about. Things that were considered ultra radical at the time but which have now become fairly mainstream.

The anarcho-punks and crusty squatter/travellers, we've always been two steps ahead of the game! You lot might laugh at my 'idealistic' ideas but one day the rest of the world will wake up! It's already started but it'll be a long and drawn out process, such is the strength is the resistance to change from the agents of reaction and conservatism...
 
Absolutely mate! Veganism has almost become fashionable. I'm too young to be a proper punk but even in my youth veganism was pretty radical. Now you can get a fucking vegan sausage roll in Greggs!

And as you say, the whole DIY ethic and awareness of issues such as environmentalism, anti-racism, anti-war; basically all the stuff Crass used to bang on about. Things that were considered ultra radical at the time but which have now become fairly mainstream.

The anarcho-punks and crusty squatter/travellers, we've always been two steps ahead of the game! You lot might laugh at my 'idealistic' ideas but one day the rest of the world will wake up! It's already started but it'll be a long and drawn out process, such is the strength is the resistance to change from the agents of reaction and conservatism...
Laugh? Not me. I spent to much time around people with the same philosophy you do. I didn't, and still dont, agree with all of it, but I have the utmost respect for the stance. The late 70s and early 80s were like a war zone at most Crass gigs
 

Buddha

Vital 1st Team Regular
Laugh? Not me. I spent to much time around people with the same philosophy you do. I didn't, and still dont, agree with all of it, but I have the utmost respect for the stance. The late 70s and early 80s were like a war zone at most Crass gigs
Nah, didn't think you'd laugh, mehmets. I know you're old punk.

And listen, you don't have to agree with everything. In fact it's almost impossible to agree with everything because it's all so diverse, and some of it is even contradictory! But hey, that's part of the beauty of anarchism! Authoritarian types who need a clearly defined ideology simply cannot understand it. And that's also a part of it's beauty!

Bet those Crass gigs were quite an experience. I imagine it being very loud and discordant, and with the politics being far more important than the music. I'm also imagining (and have read about) fascists turning up and causing trouble, resulting in the "bumps and bruises" and the "war zone" that you talk of.

I did some work at a Christian music festival a few years back and whilst I was there I met these people who were making these lovely wooden sculpture things. I gave them the crass logo and asked if they could make me a wooden replica of it. They said they could and they did. It's great! But they asked me what it meant. I didn't want to offend them so I just told them it was to do with a band who were into peace and anti-racism. They seemed happy enough with that.

When I went back the next day they'd finished the piece for me but they'd also done some research. They started telling me (as if I didn't already know, bless them!) that this band were very anti-religious and had sung bad things about Jesus. They told me that they'd had to think long and hard about whether or not to do the work for me. Then they said that after much thought and discussion they had decided that this must be a test from God, and so they had reluctantly made it for me. They wouldn't take any money for it but they urged me to do some more research into Crass because they thought this band might have something to do with the devil!

I've still got the logo thingy they made for me. It's a really nice piece of handmade art!
 
Nah, didn't think you'd laugh, mehmets. I know you're old punk.

And listen, you don't have to agree with everything. In fact it's almost impossible to agree with everything because it's all so diverse, and some of it is even contradictory! But hey, that's part of the beauty of anarchism! Authoritarian types who need a clearly defined ideology simply cannot understand it. And that's also a part of it's beauty!

Bet those Crass gigs were quite an experience. I imagine it being very loud and discordant, and with the politics being far more important than the music. I'm also imagining (and have read about) fascists turning up and causing trouble, resulting in the "bumps and bruises" and the "war zone" that you talk of.

I did some work at a Christian music festival a few years back and whilst I was there I met these people who were making these lovely wooden sculpture things. I gave them the crass logo and asked if they could make me a wooden replica of it. They said they could and they did. It's great! But they asked me what it meant. I didn't want to offend them so I just told them it was to do with a band who were into peace and anti-racism. They seemed happy enough with that.

When I went back the next day they'd finished the piece for me but they'd also done some research. They started telling me (as if I didn't already know, bless them!) that this band were very anti-religious and had sung bad things about Jesus. They told me that they'd had to think long and hard about whether or not to do the work for me. Then they said that after much thought and discussion they had decided that this must be a test from God, and so they had reluctantly made it for me. They wouldn't take any money for it but they urged me to do some more research into Crass because they thought this band might have something to do with the devil!

I've still got the logo thingy they made for me. It's a really nice piece of handmade art!
I saw them 4 times. The gigs were very intense and very serious. Loads of symbolism and sometimes too "hippyish" for my liking (poetry ffs!! lol). The violence from skins was unreal at times although they never clicked that because Crass were "peace and love", a lot of their audience were hardened anarchist/squatters and were tough and weren't scared of a punch up. At their gigs from 82ish, there seemed to be a lot of 14/15 year old gluesniffers. Crass' music, in the main, wasn't my cup of tea tbh, but I have to credit them (and the Pistols) for making me aware of the world around me. I much preferred Flux, The Mob and Zoundz. Their was a local band, Naked, who were superb and their guitarist was a Gills fan. I used to bump into him in the RE.
 

Pinhead

Vital Youth Team
The punk movement was very important in the fight against racism. The influence on the punk scene of the West Indian culture/reggae music cannot be understated. It all led to the Rock Against Racism.*

Just listen to Don Letts, he'll tell ya!


*Who can spot the ex-Gillingham Grammar School boy and GFC fan in this clip from RAR?!:
I was out in the crowd that day- brings back some memories. Are you talking about Jonny Green?
 
One of the problems with teaching history fully is that a) it would take up so much syllabus time and b) generally school kids (unless they have a good teacher) tend to get bored with it but take it up more once they have left school.
Or is that too simplistic?
Yes. At our school the history teacher told it as it was, so we got a good balance. I used to feel sorry for the enemy at times!
 

Tarian

Vital Squad Member
Only scan read these so maybe I missed it but don't see anything here about the Gills playing in red that day. Would have thought it'd be mentioned in match reports. And the picture (although black and white) doesn't immediately suggest that it was reds v blues, looks more like dark colour vs light colour. Not conclusive though, I know.
http://gillinghamfcscrapbook.co.uk/DisplayMatchReport.php?matchreport=MatchReports/1969-70/1969-70 Peterborough Utd Home FAC4.jpg&matchdate=24/01/1970&season=1969-70

So what is the story about the red shirts?
I nearly added (...but have been told off for over-long posts....:rolleyes: )

Peterborough wore white with blue trim .... which is what confused me on the day.
Gills wore red shirts and black shorts.

"Why ?" I have no idea.

And yes it was season 69/70 - so Jan 70