What Have you been Reading this Lockdown? | Vital Football

What Have you been Reading this Lockdown?

Trev_GFC

Vital Squad Member
#1
I’ve probably been reading less given no commute, but I’d be interested to see what books you’ve been reading recently. For me this lockdown I’ve read:

- the final books of the Metro 2033 trilogy (by Dmitry Glukhovsky)
- the final books of the 4-book Maze Runner series (by James Dashner) - though I now know there’s another prequel

Next up I have the first 10 Rebus novels by Ian Rankin which I’ll read between a load of other books, with the next ones up being:
- Ghost House (by Peter Straub)
- Green Mile (by Stephen King)
- Pillars of Earth (by Ken Follett)
 
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timnolongerinbrisban

Vital Reserves Team
#3
Coming to the end of Roger Daltrey's autobiography and am contemplating buying Rob Key's new book.

I've got out of practice of reading novels after going through a stage of reading what could be loosely described as classics. I enjoyed Brighton Rock and Tinker Tailor Soldier Spy, led me down a short lived John Le Carre cul de sac. Couldn't work out what all the fuss was about regarding Catcher in the Rye and to a lesser extent Catch-22.
 

jogills

Vital 1st Team Regular
#4
Catcher In The Rye is fabulous if you read it when young, less so later. My early blitz of reading has run into the sand and I struggle to concentrate to the end of a news article. One day soon I will pick up a book again and go on a spree
 

PhilK66

Vital 1st Team Regular
#5
I've been Maidenhead not Reading.

However as far as books are concerned I am up to page 200 of 900 odd pages of Mantel's novel about Thomas Cromwell. Before that a couple of trashy Coben and Patterson thrillers. Also "Shoe Dog" about the Nike owner.

Before all those "Jim Thomson - the Unsolved Mystery" by William Warren about the disappearance of the American guy who was ex CIA and went on to develop the Thai silk industry. I had read it several times before but have been working on a draft treatment for a TV series. I have never done one before but through a friend of my girlfriend who knows a high up in Hollywood an interest has been expressed. The difficult bit is creating an ending to explain Thomson's sudden disappearance.
 

Jerryattrick

Vital 1st Team Regular
#6
Coming to the end of Roger Daltrey's autobiography and am contemplating buying Rob Key's new book.

I've got out of practice of reading novels after going through a stage of reading what could be loosely described as classics. I enjoyed Brighton Rock and Tinker Tailor Soldier Spy, led me down a short lived John Le Carre cul de sac. Couldn't work out what all the fuss was about regarding Catcher in the Rye and to a lesser extent Catch-22.
At least with Le Carre you know that he was a spy so has the inside info. Mixed bag as to whether the book is good or not.

For a good spy set, i love ‘game,set,match’ novels by Len Deighton.

This was made into a tv series years ago with Ian Holm as lead. Its not available any more but managed to get a set of dvds a while ago, fantastic series.
 

Buddha

Vital 1st Team Regular
#11
Necropolis: London and its Dead by Catherine Arnold.

I have Robert Hughes, The Fatal Shore: A History of the Transportation of Convicts to Australia, 1787-1868, sitting on the shelf waiting to be read but like Lancs I've wasted too much time reading this board!

Actually, to be fair, Lancs never said it had been time wasted.
 

Trev_GFC

Vital Squad Member
#13
...I've got out of practice of reading novels after going through a stage of reading what could be loosely described as classics. I enjoyed Brighton Rock and Tinker Tailor Soldier Spy, led me down a short lived John Le Carre cul de sac. Couldn't work out what all the fuss was about regarding Catcher in the Rye and to a lesser extent Catch-22.
I’ve got a few Le Carre books to read as they were £1 on the Kindle a few months ago, but I know what you mean about Catch-22 - I gave up after a few chapters. The reputation it has at least deserves a full read-through though, so that’s on my list.

...Before that a couple of trashy Coben and Patterson thrillers. Also "Shoe Dog" about the Nike owner.

Before all those "Jim Thomson - the Unsolved Mystery" by William Warren about the disappearance of the American guy who was ex CIA and went on to develop the Thai silk industry...
Nothing wrong to me with the first load of Alex Cross ones! Have you read the one with Bill Clinton? What’s that like?
 

jokerman

Vital 1st Team Regular
#14
End of the World in Breslau -1920's German detective. Depressing and badly written/translated. Also a Polish author who's done his homework, but it's still a bit like an Englishman writing a thriller about Glasgow concentrating on how awful all the Scots are.
 

Gilles Lingam

Vital Reserves Team
#15
Rudolf Steiner - An Introduction to His Life and Work: Gary Lachman
Time and Time Again: Ben Elton
Life of Pi: Yann Martel
Knights of the Road: The Autobiography of Gypsy Dave Mills
The Discovery of France: Graham Robb
(& others which I've already forgotten .....!)
As I'm living in France, the fiction I usually buy secondhand on-spec & the non-fiction I order.
 

Suffolk Gills

Vital Youth Team
#17
The Changing Mind - Daniel Levitin. 'A neuroscientists guide to ageing well'.

Have I put you off already? Actually this is a fantastic book for anyone of a certain age (let's say over 50). It explores how our decision making skills improve with age and our happiness levels peak in our eighties. What really happens to our brains as we get older.
 

jokerman

Vital 1st Team Regular
#19
The Changing Mind - Daniel Levitin. 'A neuroscientists guide to ageing well'.

Have I put you off already? Actually this is a fantastic book for anyone of a certain age (let's say over 50). It explores how our decision making skills improve with age and our happiness levels peak in our eighties. What really happens to our brains as we get older.
I'll read that.