Things that you believe to be unique to your culture

#1
By your culture I mean either the place/country you are from or the place/country you live now.

I may be wrong but I believe that, in general, it is particular to the British Isles to add crisps to sandwiches. I'm not suggesting that no one in Australia (for example) has ever placed a crisp inside a sandwich but I've never heard of it being commonplace outside the Isles.

Pickling fish in a caustic soda solution has to be unique to Norway. I know that it happens in Montana too but that is done by Norwegian Americans who have taken the tradition with them.

Morris dancing - yes I know folk dance is a common enough thing, but men waving hankies and banging wooden sticks together with blackened faces whilst skipping.......really?


Add your own.
 
#9
kefkat - 20/3/2013 15:43

The English breakfast and fish & chips
I'll have to disabuse you of this, bacon and eggs (plus sausages and beans on occasions) is fairly standard fair in pretty much every Scandinavian hotel I've been in. They also attempt fish and chips over here but fail miserably, however I believe Australia has the same fish'n' chip culture as the UK in certain parts.
 

The Fear

A Wise Man (once sat next to him)
#11
But it is a British thing, or started as a British thing I believe?!

I have an old school friend (yes, I have a friend) who moved to Australia and set up a proper old fashioned British fish and chip shop, bit like the Greek Cypriots run in England !
 
#13
SiggyBrownie - 20/3/2013 17:41

Fish and chips is very popular over here as well. Especially during Lent. It is one of my favorite things to order.
But it's only traditional if they are proper thick cut chips, not french fries made of rehydrated compressed potato powder (McD style), with battered fish and should be served with salt AND vinegar :14: The Norwegian version is more like breaded fish fillet with french fries with salt and no vinegar. As I said, they try but fail.

 

kefkat

Vital Football Legend
#14
Villan Of The North - 20/3/2013 16:12

kefkat - 20/3/2013 15:43

The English breakfast and fish & chips
I'll have to disabuse you of this, bacon and eggs (plus sausages and beans on occasions) is fairly standard fair in pretty much every Scandinavian hotel I've been in. They also attempt fish and chips over here but fail miserably, however I believe Australia has the same fish'n' chip culture as the UK in certain parts.
Yes they do serve it in many other places but it started here:

http://www.ewgraphics.co.uk/websites/sd/Food/historyoftheengl.html

and here is the link of the great British fish & chips

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fish_and_chips
 

SiggyBrownie

Vital Football Legend
#16
Villan Of The North - 20/3/2013 07:50

SiggyBrownie - 20/3/2013 17:41

Fish and chips is very popular over here as well. Especially during Lent. It is one of my favorite things to order.
But it's only traditional if they are proper thick cut chips, not french fries made of rehydrated compressed potato powder (McD style), with battered fish and should be served with salt AND vinegar :14: The Norwegian version is more like breaded fish fillet with french fries with salt and no vinegar. As I said, they try but fail.
We do have the traditional thick or steak cut chips/fries over here and the fish and chips/fries are served with salt and malt vinegar and a lemon on the side. If you want tartar sauce you can ask for it. There are several places I have had fish and chips over here that are identical to what I had over there.
 
#19
The Fear - 20/3/2013 18:30

Beefeaters... (and no, I don't mean those who eat Steak)
Interestingly their name comes from the fact that as "common soldiers" they were extremely privileged and were usually given the best cuts of meat to eat, ie beef. :14:


 
#20
SiggyBrownie - 20/3/2013 18:26

Villan Of The North - 20/3/2013 07:50

SiggyBrownie - 20/3/2013 17:41

Fish and chips is very popular over here as well. Especially during Lent. It is one of my favorite things to order.
But it's only traditional if they are proper thick cut chips, not french fries made of rehydrated compressed potato powder (McD style), with battered fish and should be served with salt AND vinegar :14: The Norwegian version is more like breaded fish fillet with french fries with salt and no vinegar. As I said, they try but fail.
We do have the traditional thick or steak cut chips/fries over here and the fish and chips/fries are served with salt and malt vinegar and a lemon on the side. If you want tartar sauce you can ask for it. There are several places I have had fish and chips over here that are identical to what I had over there.
Way better than here then. The concept of a chip shop is, however, I believe quite alien to the US, as is the idea of serving the afore mentioned fish and chips wrapped in paper. We Brits (and Irish) do have some wacky ideas sometimes but they can work. lol