The War on Drugs - Good /Bad? | Page 2 | Vital Football

The War on Drugs - Good /Bad?

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#21
Melon Donkey - 12/11/2016 00:03

Sasquatch - 11/11/2016 23:23
The war of drugs is against anyone that want to explore there own consciousness.
Tell that to the prostitute crying out for help from the authorities but who can't escape being fed crack and heroin by her pimp to make sure she gets out on the streets and can get through more punters a night.

Nah screw the war on drugs, no point. Make it legal. No pimps, no crack and heroin prostitutes, everyone will fall into line and take drugs responsibly. There will not be an underground market undercutting the legal market for those who don't want to take their drugs at the behest of the state. Take the crap added to drugs out. Excellent idea that, make them more pure therefore stronger and more addictive.

Meanwhile the NHS crumbles under more strain as they have to fund people trotting up to get their free fix from medical establishments that i as a tax payer will be funding from an already empty well.

Make drugs legal?. Hippy bullshit.

While we are at it the war on terrorism isnt working so lets make terrorism legal.
If crack and heroin was legal she wouldn't need to go to a pimp and prostitute herself. She would also have support without the fear of being prosecuted or abused. She also wouldn't have a criminal record and would stand a better chance of rehabilitating her life. She would also be taking clean drugs, needles and being educated.

How can you compare taking drugs to terrorism? I bet many people on here drink alcohol or take prescription drugs. Imagine if you got a criminal record going to the chemist or off licence.
 
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#22
Wurzel - 11/11/2016 17:49

I was watching Judge Ringer the other day. There was a young man on there that had managed to turn his life around from being a heroine addict. He stated that he had started with cannabis and that had lead to heroine. He was very lucky. Graveyards are full of former addicts including my friends 21 year old brother. Which drugs would you legalise? How do you know if we are losing the war on drugs when we have no idea how many people have not become addicts due to it being illegal?
Good points mate. I think the street prices for any illegal drug way exceeds the price that it is to grow/make. Special medical centres could be set up with expert counselling before each person purchases the drug they want. A computer database of everyone who is buying from each centre and what they are buying. The cartels would never be able to undercut the price or drug quality. Take away all forms of punishment and bring in all forms of help and counselling. This would get the dirty stuff off the street
along with drug dealers and cartels.
 
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#23
Green Tea - 12/11/2016 09:26

Wurzel - 11/11/2016 17:49

I was watching Judge Ringer the other day. There was a young man on there that had managed to turn his life around from being a heroine addict. He stated that he had started with cannabis and that had lead to heroine. He was very lucky. Graveyards are full of former addicts including my friends 21 year old brother. Which drugs would you legalise? How do you know if we are losing the war on drugs when we have no idea how many people have not become addicts due to it being illegal?
Good points mate. I think the street prices for any illegal drug way exceeds the price that it is to grow/make. Special medical centres could be set up with expert counselling before each person purchases the drug they want. A computer database of everyone who is buying from each centre and what they are buying. The cartels would never be able to undercut the price or drug quality. Take away all forms of punishment and bring in all forms of help and counselling. This would get the dirty stuff off the street
along with drug dealers and cartels.
I think it's Portugal that have sussesfully experimented with this way of thinking.
Let's hope other country's follow suit because it's now proven to work.
Some drugs are horrendous and I would never want them legalised but avoiding the dealer who would sell the crap would help. I remember that drug where someone ate someone's face a few years back. Obviously stuff like that can't be legalised.
I also remember in the news a year or so back about the legalising weed debate. The reason they said they won't legalise it was due to the mental health issues skunk causes. However they admitted that normal weed there are not mental health cases.
Surely if they legalised the safe weed less people would smoke the stronger skunk weed?
 

Melon Donkey

Vital Football Legend
#24
Sasquatch - 12/11/2016 01:29

Melon Donkey - 12/11/2016 00:03

Sasquatch - 11/11/2016 23:23
The war of drugs is against anyone that want to explore there own consciousness.
Tell that to the prostitute crying out for help from the authorities but who can't escape being fed crack and heroin by her pimp to make sure she gets out on the streets and can get through more punters a night.

Nah screw the war on drugs, no point. Make it legal. No pimps, no crack and heroin prostitutes, everyone will fall into line and take drugs responsibly. There will not be an underground market undercutting the legal market for those who don't want to take their drugs at the behest of the state. Take the crap added to drugs out. Excellent idea that, make them more pure therefore stronger and more addictive.

Meanwhile the NHS crumbles under more strain as they have to fund people trotting up to get their free fix from medical establishments that i as a tax payer will be funding from an already empty well.

Make drugs legal?. Hippy bullshit.

While we are at it the war on terrorism isnt working so lets make terrorism legal.

How can you compare taking drugs to terrorism? I bet many people on here drink alcohol or take prescription drugs. Imagine if you got a criminal record going to the chemist or off licence.
Actually you can mention drug taking and terrorism. Well known that terrorist organisations fund themselves through drug supply. Afghanistan and heroin production being a recent example. Anyhow thats not the point i was making.

My point was that it seems that people are saying that the war on drugs is not working so we give up and don't bother and the best way would be to make it legsl.. You wouldnt use that argument against terrorism and violent crime when you could say that we are not succeeding in combating them either.
 

Melon Donkey

Vital Football Legend
#25
Green Tea - 12/11/2016 09:26

Wurzel - 11/11/2016 17:49

I was watching Judge Ringer the other day. There was a young man on there that had managed to turn his life around from being a heroine addict. He stated that he had started with cannabis and that had lead to heroine. He was very lucky. Graveyards are full of former addicts including my friends 21 year old brother. Which drugs would you legalise? How do you know if we are losing the war on drugs when we have no idea how many people have not become addicts due to it being illegal?
Good points mate. I think the street prices for any illegal drug way exceeds the price that it is to grow/make. Special medical centres could be set up with expert counselling before each person purchases the drug they want. A computer database of everyone who is buying from each centre and what they are buying. The cartels would never be able to undercut the price or drug quality. Take away all forms of punishment and bring in all forms of help and counselling. This would get the dirty stuff off the street
along with drug dealers and cartels.
I think it is incredibly to naive to think that criminals who make vast sums of money from drugs supply would just give up and do something else because the authorities are supplying them to users. They would find a way, crime evolves with the changing times. You deal with one aspect of crime then another one pops up.

As for medical centres, counselling, computer data bases. The funding for this will come from where then?. An Nhs on its knees?. The great british taxpayer?. Sorry, if there is suddenly millions and millions of pounds to spend on allowing people to indulge themselves voluntarily in such a pointless exercise as drug taking then can we spend that on say finding a cure for cancer?, more childrens hospitals, or allowing the older generation to live out their final years in comfort and free from financial burden or worries. The list could go on.....
 
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Guest

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#26
Funding comes from the sale of the drug. Hence the first part of my post mentions prices. Instead of cartels and dealers making a huge profit, the money would go right back into helping the user.
 

BodyButter

Vital Football Legend
#27
I'd imagine that if all drugs were legalised, the Pablo Escobars of this world would jump straight into legal production and distribution. All of their legal problems would disappear and they would be able to declare their income and pay taxes on it rather than paying people to launder it for them.

I'm sure there would be a period of adjustment while the old guard struggled with the new legal reality but in the end it would become a business like any other.

As for those taking the drugs, they are taking them anyway. The legal aspect is only an inconvenience. If heroin was legalised, I wouldn't take it. I might smoke a little weed now and then but getting off my face doesn't really appeal to me any more.
 
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Guest

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#28
I'm not saying give up. Just take a different approach like Portugal have and succeeding. Maybe the tax from the sale of drugs could fund it. In some states in the U.S. are making millions in taxes from the sale of cannabis alone.
 
#30
It's all very interesting, Tubbz. THC does indeed seem to inhibit certain cancers, particularly liver cancer, but unfortunately, not all.

There are so many stories out there of cancer patients quitting chemo and taking cannabis, only to die. It is in no way a substitute for proper treatment.

The National Cancer Institute has acknowledged it's benefits, and their guidelines updated. As a federal agency, it is a good step forward, but more research definitely needs to be done before we claim a cure.
 
#31
I think this is quite a good, unbiased view of the current situation. I know we all want a miracle cure, but this gives the good, and the bad. I hope you'll read it.

http://scienceblog.cancerresearchuk.org/2012/07/25/cannabis-cannabinoids-and-cancer-the-evidence-so-far/

At the moment, there simply isn’t enough evidence to prove that cannabinoids – whether natural or synthetic – works to treat cancer in patients, although research is ongoing. And there’s certainly no evidence that ‘street’ cannabis can treat cancer.

As a research-based organisation, we continue to watch the progress of scientists around the world for advances that may benefit people with cancer. And although cannabinoid research is an interesting avenue, it’s certainly not the only one.
 

TuBBz

Are You Local?
#32
There is no doubt in my mind that this is a powerful medicine that is being suppressed mate

I don't think anyone is saying this is a cure-all but the fact that its research is being hampered and results dismissed by big pharma surely tells its own story

 

Trekker

Has a high horse
#33
Sasquatch - 12/11/2016 01:29

Melon Donkey - 12/11/2016 00:03

Sasquatch - 11/11/2016 23:23
The war of drugs is against anyone that want to explore there own consciousness.
Tell that to the prostitute crying out for help from the authorities but who can't escape being fed crack and heroin by her pimp to make sure she gets out on the streets and can get through more punters a night.

Nah screw the war on drugs, no point. Make it legal. No pimps, no crack and heroin prostitutes, everyone will fall into line and take drugs responsibly. There will not be an underground market undercutting the legal market for those who don't want to take their drugs at the behest of the state. Take the crap added to drugs out. Excellent idea that, make them more pure therefore stronger and more addictive.

Meanwhile the NHS crumbles under more strain as they have to fund people trotting up to get their free fix from medical establishments that i as a tax payer will be funding from an already empty well.

Make drugs legal?. Hippy bullshit.

While we are at it the war on terrorism isnt working so lets make terrorism legal.
If crack and heroin was legal she wouldn't need to go to a pimp and prostitute herself. She would also have support without the fear of being prosecuted or abused. She also wouldn't have a criminal record and would stand a better chance of rehabilitating her life. She would also be taking clean drugs, needles and being educated.

How can you compare taking drugs to terrorism? I bet many people on here drink alcohol or take prescription drugs. Imagine if you got a criminal record going to the chemist or off licence.
I actually have changed my stance in some ways, don't get me wrong, I'm vehemently anti drugs but I believe in education and control rather than sentencing users.
However you can't say she wouldn't have to prostitute herself because she would still have to pay for her drugs. And the point about a criminal record for going to the chemist is ridiculous because those things are legal so the question doesn't arise.
 
#34
TuBBz - 14/12/2016 16:06

There is no doubt in my mind that this is a powerful medicine that is being suppressed mate

I don't think anyone is saying this is a cure-all but the fact that its research is being hampered and results dismissed by big pharma surely tells its own story
In what way is it's research being hampered? I can't find any evidence for this theory. In fact, the opposite seems true.
 

mike_field

Vital Football Legend
#35
There's a clear bias but anybody interested in the war on drug's really should've read snowblind for a start. If only the US had realised the could import and tax and not gone immediately to ban when it was in cola for god sake.

And I found inconsistencies in the book, but as said its written with a bias but similar claims are elsewhere.

And there should be no confusion between legalising Heroine and weed or cocaine - but as ever there should be a sensible understanding between the pure product and the padding out cut crap for profit.

And I say that as a drinker and somebody who gets a headache if he's in the same street as somebody else on pot so I've never tried harder.

Heath, big pharma have been against research and distribution of weed to my knowledge unless they could patent and profit (no great surprise to be honest they are a business)...most US weed shops for medical purposes are run by Uni's I believe or private exempted charities and not big pharma backed but they are now getting on board because the horse has bolted.

Nature tends to show it provides for all, it's about time we stopped overreacting to those who'd stick a 12 foot cactus and scorpion down their one eye because they don't know better lol
 
#36
Mexican drug cartels using weaponised drones now....

The construction of the bomb found in Mexico, on the other hand, indicated a distinctly South American pedigree.

Called a Papa Bomba, or Potato Bomb, the concept was originally developed by the Revolutionary Armed Forces of Colombia (FARC) for use against security forces over the course of five decades of civil war. Instead of being carried by drones, the FARC’s Papa Bombas were designed to be thrown by hand or launched from home-made mortars called tatucas.
https://www.thedailybeast.com/game-of-drones-mexicos-cartels-have-a-deadly-new-weapon
 
#40
Interesting read:

Since it decriminalised all drugs in 2001, Portugal has seen dramatic drops in overdoses, HIV infection and drug-related crime.
http://bit.ly/2A96989

This policy alone cannot take all the credit - a wider cultural shift in how Portugal views and deals with drug addicts has been important in bringing numbers down. That's not to say there isn't still a problem, but surely this is a far more effective approach the criminalising addicts, sending them to prison and trapping them forever in the vicious cycle?

The official policy of decriminalisation made it far easier for a broad range of services (health, psychiatry, employment, housing etc) that had been struggling to pool their resources and expertise, to work together more effectively to serve their communities.

The language began to shift, too. Those who had been referred to sneeringly as drogados (junkies) – became known more broadly, more sympathetically, and more accurately, as “people who use drugs” or “people with addiction disorders”.
Interesting stuff.