The "City" is blue | Vital Forums

The "City" is blue

Barbles

Vital Newbie
#1
Please accept this as a question not baiting.
Obviously your rivalry with the OT lot is almost as bitter as ours, but what I can't understand is why they are called "Manchester" United when the club are from another City (Salford)
Does this go back to land boundaries or before Salford was a City or what?
Please explain if anyone knows the answer.
Thanks
 

cocopops

Vital Newbie
#7
But Rushcliffe is in Nottinghamshire isn't it?according to the "always correct" :hmmm:Wikipedia
Yes Baubles,but they don't play in Nottingham,much the same way as Mansfield play in Nottinghamshire but not Nottingham,I was just pointing out the irony of Nottingham Forest not playing in the city of Nottingham but Notts County do,are you winding me up :thumbup::rotfl:
 

Barbles

Vital Newbie
#9
Yes Baubles,but they don't play in Nottingham,much the same way as Mansfield play in Nottinghamshire but not Nottingham,I was just pointing out the irony of Nottingham Forest not playing in the city of Nottingham but Notts County do,are you winding me up :thumbup::rotfl:
No, seriously I wasn't. All this Nottingham/Nottinghamshire is confusing
 

Colin Is The King

Vital Football Legend
#10
United changed their name in 1902, from Newton Heath, and moved to Old Trafford in 1910. It's in Stretford, which is now part of Trafford MBC. Never been in Salford, although the boundary (the Ship Canal) is only a few hundred yards away.
The boundary with Manchester is about half a mile away, and, in fact, as a city, Salford is older than Manchester.
Always a strange one that when you walk down Deansgate in the city centre of Manchester (the A56 - stay on it and it takes you past the ground), you are only a matter of yards from Salford, as the River Irwell is the boundary in that case.
 
#11
United changed their name in 1902, from Newton Heath, and moved to Old Trafford in 1910. It's in Stretford, which is now part of Trafford MBC. Never been in Salford, although the boundary (the Ship Canal) is only a few hundred yards away.
The boundary with Manchester is about half a mile away, and, in fact, as a city, Salford is older than Manchester.
Always a strange one that when you walk down Deansgate in the city centre of Manchester (the A56 - stay on it and it takes you past the ground), you are only a matter of yards from Salford, as the River Irwell is the boundary in that case.
That is a great answer thank you Colin is the King:thumbup: