countryfile tonight - n/g | Vital Football

countryfile tonight - n/g

wxgill

Vital Squad Member
#1
Had a piece from a presenter and people talking about BLM.

Twitter is kicking off about it. This show about farmers etc has been hijacked by the left wing BBC!

"While @DwayneFields found solace in the landscapes of the UK and beyond, many in Black, Asian and minority ethnic groups see the countryside as being a white environment #countryfile"

"The BAME community feel the countryside is not for them"

Have a watch:

https://www.bbc.co.uk/iplayer/episode/m000kk36/countryfile-ellies-mini-hub
 

Buddha

Vital 1st Team Regular
#6
Had a piece from a presenter and people talking about BLM.

Twitter is kicking off about it. This show about farmers etc has been hijacked by the left wing BBC!

"While @DwayneFields found solace in the landscapes of the UK and beyond, many in Black, Asian and minority ethnic groups see the countryside as being a white environment #countryfile"

"The BAME community feel the countryside is not for them"

Have a watch:

https://www.bbc.co.uk/iplayer/episode/m000kk36/countryfile-ellies-mini-hub
I've not watched the programme, Wx, and I don't intend to. So I might have misunderstood this.

But, I'd guess that (and I have nothing to back this up, no evidence or proof, Tarian!) the countryside is a predominantly white environment and that the great majority of the BAME community do live in urban areas.

I also expect (but again this is just a feeling, I might have it completely wrong) that prejudice against the BAME communities is more rife in the countryside than it is in the towns and cities. I'd imagine that if I'm right about this it may simply be because there are far less BAME people residing in the countryside and so the country folk have had less opportunity to meet and live alongside people who don't have white skin. And it's a lot easier to be prejudiced against something you have little or no experience of.

As I said, these are just impressions that I've formed, I may be well wide of the mark here.
 

wxgill

Vital Squad Member
#7
I've not watched the programme, Wx, and I don't intend to. So I might have misunderstood this.

But, I'd guess that (and I have nothing to back this up, no evidence or proof, Tarian!) the countryside is a predominantly white environment and that the great majority of the BAME community do live in urban areas.

I also expect (but again this is just a feeling, I might have it completely wrong) that prejudice against the BAME communities is more rife in the countryside than it is in the towns and cities. I'd imagine that if I'm right about this it may simply be because there are far less BAME people residing in the countryside and so the country folk have had less opportunity to meet and live alongside people who don't have white skin. And it's a lot easier to be prejudiced against something you have little or no experience of.

As I said, these are just impressions that I've formed, I may be well wide of the mark here.
Countryfile ahs always been a non-political show but when you start putting BLM campaigners in the show you are really going beyond standards. This show is not for political issues.

Without watching it it is difficult to word how bizarre this edition is.
 

Buddha

Vital 1st Team Regular
#8
Countryfile ahs always been a non-political show but when you start putting BLM campaigners in the show you are really going beyond standards. This show is not for political issues.

Without watching it it is difficult to word how bizarre this edition is.
Yeah, I understand that the programme isn't really about politics. Having said that, I've always thought that there's not much that isn't actually political. It's like when someone says that they're not really political - just making that statement is actually political. If it's a programme about the countryside and they're dealing with a countryside issue (in this case the lack of ethnic diversity in the countryside) then are they really going so off topic?

But I do take your point. Perhaps not something to get too upset or angry about though, maybe a wry smile would be more appropriate?

Anyway, I've not seen the programme so I'm not really disagreeing with you or saying any of this with too much conviction.
 

mozzer59

Vital Squad Member
#9
Try to take twitter with a pinch of salt if everything on there reflected reality then Corbyn would of won the last election by a landslide.
Twitter is like every toilet wall! The best thing to do with twitter is post something then watch the comments, but dont respond! It’s like seeing an ad in a window for guitar lessons and you get something who writes down the phone number, calls it and shouts “I dont want fucking guitar lessons”
 

chris who

Vital 1st Team Regular
#10
I've not watched the programme, Wx, and I don't intend to. So I might have misunderstood this.

But, I'd guess that (and I have nothing to back this up, no evidence or proof, Tarian!) the countryside is a predominantly white environment and that the great majority of the BAME community do live in urban areas.

I also expect (but again this is just a feeling, I might have it completely wrong) that prejudice against the BAME communities is more rife in the countryside than it is in the towns and cities. I'd imagine that if I'm right about this it may simply be because there are far less BAME people residing in the countryside and so the country folk have had less opportunity to meet and live alongside people who don't have white skin. And it's a lot easier to be prejudiced against something you have little or no experience of.

As I said, these are just impressions that I've formed, I may be well wide of the mark here.
It was touched on when I said about moving to the Suffolk countryside .Another poster said he had tried and did not feel welcome. But as you say it is about getting to know people getting involved. If that means I can't get to see the Gills as often or a mate down here so be it .To make it work I simply have to make the effort. Years ago I was involved in the community where I live now.As time went on it got knock on the head for reasons out of my control. My wife was brought up a villager so understands a little about the difference it will make.I think you are spot on though most people who hate people because of colour,race or religion have little or no experience of them and certainly have never tried to befriend someone of their pet hated type of person.
Most ordinary people or whatever race are much the same under the skin.It is the leaders who can lead them in the wrong direction.
 

nitram77

Vital Squad Member
#11
This is always a difficulty with discussing race/culture, with 3% black and 7% Asian in our society, why are there so few Asian football players compared to black. I'm pretty sure we aren't discriminating against one group whilst welcoming the other.
There can, and almost certainly will be some cultural differences that influence the way people are raised, this doesn't immediately mean there is racism involved.
 

ThreeSixes

Vital 1st Team Regular
#12
Ironic that the black guy interviewed said that he went to the countryside to "get away from it all". People watch programmes like Country file to "get away from it" too, but I suppose BLM is just so important, everyone HAS to have it rammed down their throats repeatedly.

I feel a bit less racist after watching it, so thats a positive.
 

RotherhitheGill

Vital Squad Member
#13
Bloody hell, when I go to the "Country" I feel out of place. Full of people with funny attitudes (well most of them vote Tory to start with) and the worst thing is that it smells peculiar (stinks) :sick:
 

ThreeSixes

Vital 1st Team Regular
#14
I also expect (but again this is just a feeling, I might have it completely wrong) that prejudice against the BAME communities is more rife in the countryside than it is in the towns and cities. I'd imagine that if I'm right about this it may simply be because there are far less BAME people residing in the countryside and so the country folk have had less opportunity to meet and live alongside people who don't have white skin. And it's a lot easier to be prejudiced against something you have little or no experience of.

As I said, these are just impressions that I've formed, I may be well wide of the mark here.
Yep, you might be right. And being prejudiced is usually bad.....


Bloody hell, when I go to the "Country" I feel out of place. Full of people with funny attitudes (well most of them vote Tory to start with) and the worst thing is that it smells peculiar (stinks) :sick:
...but it can sometimes be funny too!

:p
 

GillsBluenose

Vital 1st Team Regular
#15
I thought the guy presenting the item made some good points but the woman he interviewed lost a lot of credibility when she said something along the lines of white people say to her that they miss the old days when they could be openly racist !

Would a racist actually put it that way? In my experience, they would either not be aware that what they say is actually racist, or they would carry on regardless.

In fact, I am not even sure that a true racist would even acknowledge the term racist.

Something about it didn't ring true to me.
 
#16
It was touched on when I said about moving to the Suffolk countryside .Another poster said he had tried and did not feel welcome.
It is a little different in Suffolk. I think it is because there are not as many larger towns as in Kent. Village life anywhere often likes to keep the rest of big bad UK at arms length. Commuting into London every day I felt like the one inflicting Covid on everyone.

I stopped watching Countryfile when it started talking to us like we were watching Blue Peter.
 

shotshy

Vital 1st Team Regular
#17
It is a little different in Suffolk. I think it is because there are not as many larger towns as in Kent. Village life anywhere often likes to keep the rest of big bad UK at arms length. Commuting into London every day I felt like the one inflicting Covid on everyone.

I stopped watching Countryfile when it started talking to us like we were watching Blue Peter.
You’re not wrong there Suffolk.
The vicar in Appledore told me that unless you was born there, you’re an outsider.
He’d lived there since he was six.
 

nitram77

Vital Squad Member
#18
Another case of discrimination in football is the lack of BAME candidates in management, as in many cases this article only looks at it from one view point.
I don't argue that racism exists, it seems quite obvious that it does, yet the article doesn't look at why 25% of retiring England players are from a BAME background, when people from this group don't make up 25% of the population.

https://www.independent.co.uk/sport...ble-data-football-jonathan-liew-a8379111.html
 

chris who

Vital 1st Team Regular
#19
It is a little different in Suffolk. I think it is because there are not as many larger towns as in Kent. Village life anywhere often likes to keep the rest of big bad UK at arms length. Commuting into London every day I felt like the one inflicting Covid on everyone.

I stopped watching Countryfile when it started talking to us like we were watching Blue Peter.
I might have a bit of a advantage over some folk.My Great great Grandparents are buried about only a short drive from where I am looking to move too .You dont get much more local than that.i also certainly have relatives living in Suffolk not that I would know mind.
 

ThreeSixes

Vital 1st Team Regular
#20
I thought the guy presenting the item made some good points but the woman he interviewed lost a lot of credibility when she said something along the lines of white people say to her that they miss the old days when they could be openly racist !
I concur - a lot of the BLM arguments don't stand up to forensic examination.

I don't understand the point of the item? Yes, there aren't many BAME in rural areas, but everyone knows that. If it was "the countryside is for everyone so BAME people should be out enjoying it" then why not say that, instead of putting a BLM spin on it?

The guy was engaging - why they couldn't just have him presenting an item on nature instead of referencing his colour I don't know. He was just a bloke in a backpack enjoying nature, he isn't MLK.