Coronavirus vaccine | Page 63 | Vital Football

Coronavirus vaccine

SteveTreacle

Vital Squad Member
I'm not sure those are the only reason Germans have refused the Oxford AZ vaccine Nobby. It was early messaging from above casting doubt on its efficacy and appropriateness for all age groups that caused this. Ironic that the message from above is now doubling down that it is good and that individuals must accept it or go without. I fancy the German public would have taken a Spitfire Battle of Britain vaccine if convinced it worked.
Given the Germans have rolled out about a quarter of the vaccines that we have and have more people to vaccinate, I'd suggst that beggars can't be choosers. I wonder what those Germans refusing the Oxford vaccine make of the Germans apparently eyeing up Russia's Sputnick vaccine?!?!
 

SteveTreacle

Vital Squad Member
Will be interesting to see how the door to door things works if they do it. Remember reading not long ago about someone scamming an elderly lady by knocking on her door, offering her the vaccine for £150. She agreed, who knows what he actually injected her with.

It's certainly something they'll have to keep a very close eye on to ensure no-one tries to take advantage of the elderly and vulnerable in that way.
I heard talk about this and vaccine passports this morning and have also heard about the purported poor uptake with ethnic minority communities. I posted yesterday my approval and support of the way the vaccine's been rolled out, but I think we need to be ruthless.

Set targets and plans and stick to them. If people don't want the vaccine (whether it be because they are loonies who believe they are being injected with a tracker from Bill Gates, are cowtowing to mumbo jumbo religion (or even witchdoctors - I heard someone on LBC at the weekend phone-in and said that her mum wasn't having the vaccine for that reason linked to hert African upbringin) or can't be bothered to get to vaccine centres of the docs, tough. Obviously, I exclude those who have disbilities or conditions which mean they can't get to centres and accomodation should be made to vaccinate them, but if you're a loony, stupid, lazy or believe in nonsense, let's move on and give someone else the jab and get it rolled out to everyone who wants it. Then let's set up a vaccine passport system so only those vaccinated can get on flights, got to a football match, go to the cinemna etc etc.
 

ThreeSixes

Vital 1st Team Regular
I heard talk about this and vaccine passports this morning and have also heard about the purported poor uptake with ethnic minority communities. I posted yesterday my approval and support of the way the vaccine's been rolled out, but I think we need to be ruthless.
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Nothing is going to be done that will negatively impact BAME. The low vaccine take up is disappointing but it is predictable - why would you need to take a vaccine if you believe you are protected by God /Allah?

I don't think the link between faith and low vaccine take up has even been mooted as a reason, even though it is blindingly obvious. It's one of the downsides I suppose of a multicultural society.
 

Jerryattrick

Vital 1st Team Regular
Nothing is going to be done that will negatively impact BAME. The low vaccine take up is disappointing but it is predictable - why would you need to take a vaccine if you believe you are protected by God /Allah?

I don't think the link between faith and low vaccine take up has even been mooted as a reason, even though it is blindingly obvious. It's one of the downsides I suppose of a multicultural society.
or the upside of a free society
 

LancsGordoRoad

Vital 1st Team Regular
Nothing is going to be done that will negatively impact BAME. The low vaccine take up is disappointing but it is predictable - why would you need to take a vaccine if you believe you are protected by God /Allah?

I don't think the link between faith and low vaccine take up has even been mooted as a reason, even though it is blindingly obvious. It's one of the downsides I suppose of a multicultural society.

It does seem to be an issue. Perhaps the pro-vaccine message needs greater amplification via Mosques in relation to Muslims; similarly, relevant places of worship in relation to other faiths.
 

jogills

Vital 1st Team Regular
Will be interesting to see how the door to door things works if they do it. Remember reading not long ago about someone scamming an elderly lady by knocking on her door, offering her the vaccine for £150. She agreed, who knows what he actually injected her with.

It's certainly something they'll have to keep a very close eye on to ensure no-one tries to take advantage of the elderly and vulnerable in that way.
I think it might be less of a problem as most of the people we would be aiming at are living with others. It's the elderly living alone that are most likely to fall prey to scammers.
 

ThreeSixes

Vital 1st Team Regular
I think it might be less of a problem as most of the people we would be aiming at are living with others. It's the elderly living alone that are most likely to fall prey to scammers.
No, scams are a problem unfortunately with people taking advantage of lack of knowledge and poor language skills
 

jogills

Vital 1st Team Regular
No, scams are a problem unfortunately with people taking advantage of lack of knowledge and poor language skills
Of course they are but the people we are talking about live in bigger households. Contrary to your characterisation I have watched interviews with people explaining how they will have the vaccine but their parents are unsure. It's a process of explanation, reassurance and facilitation. Of course we press on with numbers but we need to hoover up all the reluctant or live with enclaves of virus reproduction. It's not just ethnic minorities and the religious either. You can announce those with learning difficulties as a priority for instance, identifying, finding and engaging with them is another matter. Many live "independently" out there somewhere often being exploited by others.
 

PhilK66

Vital 1st Team Regular
I heard talk about this and vaccine passports this morning and have also heard about the purported poor uptake with ethnic minority communities. I posted yesterday my approval and support of the way the vaccine's been rolled out, but I think we need to be ruthless.

Set targets and plans and stick to them. If people don't want the vaccine (whether it be because they are loonies who believe they are being injected with a tracker from Bill Gates, are cowtowing to mumbo jumbo religion (or even witchdoctors - I heard someone on LBC at the weekend phone-in and said that her mum wasn't having the vaccine for that reason linked to hert African upbringin) or can't be bothered to get to vaccine centres of the docs, tough. Obviously, I exclude those who have disbilities or conditions which mean they can't get to centres and accomodation should be made to vaccinate them, but if you're a loony, stupid, lazy or believe in nonsense, let's move on and give someone else the jab and get it rolled out to everyone who wants it. Then let's set up a vaccine passport system so only those vaccinated can get on flights, got to a football match, go to the cinemna etc etc.
Or leave the house!
 

ThreeSixes

Vital 1st Team Regular
Of course they are but the people we are talking about live in bigger households. Contrary to your characterisation I have watched interviews with people explaining how they will have the vaccine but their parents are unsure. It's a process of explanation, reassurance and facilitation. Of course we press on with numbers but we need to hoover up all the reluctant or live with enclaves of virus reproduction. It's not just ethnic minorities and the religious either. You can announce those with learning difficulties as a priority for instance, identifying, finding and engaging with them is another matter. Many live "independently" out there somewhere often being exploited by others.
I'm getting the information from colleagues that are working with charities in East London. They are saying that already people in the poorest ethnic communities are being targeted by people knocking on their doors, saying the resident is in trouble and needs pay for a vaccine. These aren't people that are going to watch the news, or read papers. They won't know what is going on
 

jogills

Vital 1st Team Regular
I'm getting the information from colleagues that are working with charities in East London. They are saying that already people in the poorest ethnic communities are being targeted by people knocking on their doors, saying the resident is in trouble and needs pay for a vaccine. These aren't people that are going to watch the news, or read papers. They won't know what is going on
I am sure that is right and sadly predictable too. I was pointing out that the group there is so much apparent concern for tend not to live alone and are so less vulnerable to such behaviour. The most vulnerable to that sort of scam are the single elderly with money in the house. We had relatives who fell victim to that in the past. I hear the terms vaccine reluctant/cautious are now being used, which perhaps describe things better.

Information, sentiment and knowledge travels erratically through the population. I like other posters was initially bemused by the priority given to the older end, who have little that has to be done and can hide away. It took a bit to dawn that it was all to do with mmanaging NHS resources and that our duty was to get vaccinated and hold fire. I saw a muslim man of around my age on TV, who said that the vaccine was not for him, he was old and trusted in god. I think that was about my initial reaction with the substitution of fate for god.
 

madrid_gill

Vital Squad Member
I think it might be less of a problem as most of the people we would be aiming at are living with others. It's the elderly living alone that are most likely to fall prey to scammers.
The official campaign may be aimed at those living with others, but I don't see how that's going to stop scammers from targeting the elderly living alone.

Up until now, the idea of someone going door to door giving vaccinations would've sounded very suspicious. But now that it's been reported that they're planning on doing just that, any elderly person that's seen those reports is less likely to be suspicious.

Throw in a little bit of pressure for those who do get suspicious ("This is your chance right here, Ethel. You're top of the list at the moment, if you don't have it done today, you'll drop back to the bottom of the list, you'll be waiting months for another chance to get vaccinated").

I think the plan needs to be organised very carefully indeed, because it's got the potential to be a scammer's dream.
 

jogills

Vital 1st Team Regular
The official campaign may be aimed at those living with others, but I don't see how that's going to stop scammers from targeting the elderly living alone.

Up until now, the idea of someone going door to door giving vaccinations would've sounded very suspicious. But now that it's been reported that they're planning on doing just that, any elderly person that's seen those reports is less likely to be suspicious.

Throw in a little bit of pressure for those who do get suspicious ("This is your chance right here, Ethel. You're top of the list at the moment, if you don't fake callershave it done today, you'll drop back to the bottom of the list, you'll be waiting months for another chance to get vaccinated").

I think the plan needs to be organised very carefully indeed, because it's got the potential to be a scammer's dream.
I don"t disagree with that but it was Fulteras rather than Ethel that was the focus. I think we are fairly good at knowing who the Ethel's are and where they live and how to get them on board. I accept that any public statement is material for the dishonest. I am sure there will be cases because scammers haven't stopped during covid but I don' t believe any campaign of this sort will result in a deluge of fake callers.
 
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shotshy

Vital 1st Team Regular
I read this morning that Bulgaria has given up trying to entice vaccine sceptics and, in the words of Badfinger, if you want it come and get it, in a free for all.
Many of their elderly were resistant due to t’internet.
 

Vambogills

Vital 1st Team Regular
Nothing is going to be done that will negatively impact BAME. The low vaccine take up is disappointing but it is predictable - why would you need to take a vaccine if you believe you are protected by God /Allah?

I don't think the link between faith and low vaccine take up has even been mooted as a reason, even though it is blindingly obvious. It's one of the downsides I suppose of a multicultural society.
If that is the reason then clearly God/Allah is not listening.
There is a disproportionately higher level of Covid death and long illness persisting in some BAME communities.
Sadly that is down to stubborn, evidence driven science!
 

Nobby_66

Vital 1st Team Regular
If that is the reason then clearly God/Allah is not listening.
There is a disproportionately higher level of Covid death and long illness persisting in some BAME communities.
Sadly that is down to stubborn, evidence driven science!
Which would make you think those communities would be bang up for a vaccination instead of the mistrust that seems to be flying around. It's a difficult job for the government/NHS to talk these people round and I really don't see what else they can do that hasn't already been done.
The short film they showed on tv the other night, with high profile celebs from BAME backgrounds promoting the jab, was very good but all I keep hearing on tv is that "not enough is being done". I'm at a loss personally as to how they can be convinced.
 

Trev_GFC

Vital Squad Member
Some people just don’t have the intelligence/common sense, and are too proud/stuck in their dumb ways to change. If you haven’t got it by now then no amount of tabloid stories and TV adverts with relatable individuals will work.

Unfortunately these people vote, reproduce, share their mentality through generations and we have to rely on them for the good of the nation.

I honestly don’t know what the answer is to this wider social problem.
 
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jogills

Vital 1st Team Regular
Which would make you think those communities would be bang up for a vaccination instead of the mistrust that seems to be flying around. It's a difficult job for the government/NHS to talk these people round and I really don't see what else they can do that hasn't already been done.
The short film they showed on tv the other night, with high profile celebs from BAME backgrounds promoting the jab, was very good but all I keep hearing on tv is that "not enough is being done". I'm at a loss personally as to how they can be convinced.
I think it's got to be local GP and council led and literally contacting people on the doorstep. I agree hard to see what more can be done nationally. Places of worship are being used as centres and those with influence in the community are being brought on board.
 

madrid_gill

Vital Squad Member
Not yet, they can't, but I read the other day that vaccine trials on children are now underway, presumably it won't be long until they can also be vaccinated.

Some people seem to be horrified by the thought of schools going back, but if it's well-managed, there's no reason why it necessarily has to be a problem. Schools here have been open since September, my childrens' school sent out a letter last week with their statistics since September. For a school with around 1850 pupils and staff, with 77 classes (it goes right the way through from nursery to 6th form):

Positive cases reported: 44
Positive cases with contacts at school, leading to other students having to self-isolate: 19
Whole classes closed due to a positive case within the class: 8
Totel students having to isolate since September: 199

They seem to have things reasonably under control. 44 positive cases out of 1850 (under 2.5%) certainly doesn't seem to suggest any super-spreading. If anyone at the school tests positive, they decide on a case-by-case basis whether there's been sufficient contact with the rest of the class to isolate the entire class, or just isolate those who've been in closest contact with the positive case. In my eldest's class (in secondary school) there haven't been any cases. In my youngest's class (juniors) there have been 2. One was the teacher, the teacher was off for 2 weeks but the class continued as normal with a substitute. The other case was someone from my son's group of close friends, in that case my son and a couple of others had to self-isolate as a precaution for 10 days (none of them tested positive).
Just seen that apparently masks aren't going to be compulsory when the kids go back to school. If that's the case, then I can understand the concerns a lot better. At my sons' school, masks have been compulsory ever since they went back. Think it's for all kids over 6, although I'm not sure whether that's a national policy or just our school's policy.
 

Nobby_66

Vital 1st Team Regular
Just seen that apparently masks aren't going to be compulsory when the kids go back to school. If that's the case, then I can understand the concerns a lot better. At my sons' school, masks have been compulsory ever since they went back. Think it's for all kids over 6, although I'm not sure whether that's a national policy or just our school's policy.
I'm sure I read they were going to be compulsory at secondary school and above?????